NIH-funded study identifies receptor as possible target for treating anhedonia

“The fast-fail approach aims to help researchers determine—quickly and efficiently—whether targeting a specific neurobiological mechanism has the hypothesized effect and is a potential candidate for further clinical trials,” explained Joshua A. Gordon, M.D., Ph.D., director of NIMH. “Positive results suggest that targeting a neurobiological mechanism affects brain function as expected, while negative results allow researchers to eliminate that target from further consideration. We hope this approach will pave the way towards the development of new and better treatments for individuals with mental illnesses.”

In this study, researcher Andrew D. Krystal, M.D., who began the research while at the Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, and is now at the University of California, San Francisco, and colleagues report the first comprehensive application of this fast-fail approach. The researchers examined the kappa opioid receptor (KOR) as a possible neurobiological target for the treatment of anhedonia. Previous findings suggest that drugs that block the KOR, known as KOR antagonists, can affect reward-related brain circuits in ways that could improve reward processing and reverse anhedonia and associated symptoms."

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/news/science-news/2020/fast-fail-trial-shows-new-approach-to-identifying-brain-targets-for-clinical-treatments.shtml

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Very intresting indeed…Time to do some research how to antagonize KOR with supplements :D…

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check this out too

perhaps a combo of an hdac inhibitor + next gen antidepressant would be effective