I resigned. How do people without jobs arrange their daily life?

I have some cognitive problems and motivation problems. I can’t get fun from my work. Although its salary is very high, I’m tired of such a life. Especially it needs to turn my rigid brain. I decided to go back to my family and live a leisure life “give myself a long holiday”. How do you spend your day? What do you do in everyday?
Or is there a job for us “old guys”?:joy:

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Did you leave your job @baitongWu ? Or just a vacation?

I started working part time this year, and feel like it’s helped me.

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A thorough resignation is not a vacation. China is a garbage country. He exploits everyone crazy. That’s why you see China’s rapid development. Chinese people don’t have holidays. I can only work intermittently in the future. I’m afraid I can’t stand it. What part-time job do you do? What do you do after work?

When I was working at a technology startup, I was doing a Chinese-style “9-9-6” schedule for many years. Now I’m closer to 20-30 hours per week. I don’t think this is as easy to do in other industries though.

After work I read, exercise, cook, play piano, try to be social here and there.

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It sounds very pleasant. I want to find a relaxed job

Maybe try traveling before you start working again. Preferably not to cities but to nature/wilderness. It’s not easy with our condition but possibly helped me physically and mentally. But only if you can go with friends or family you like to keep you safe if you have down days while traveling. Traveling can have beneficial effects on the brain.

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thank you,my friend

honestly i just try to do the work regardless of how i feel. i have too many bills to pay and too many people to support that depend on me.

so motivation is a non-issue for me. i dont care if im motivated or not motivated. and most of the time im not motivated.

the cognitive problems are the biggest barrier, but i do my best, and try to find different tricks and shortcuts in my work by experimeting.

good thing about anhedonia is ive stopped giving a shit about how i feel. i want to feel anything i can so even when im scared to death about something ill happily dive into it now

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There has got to be people with a coughing fetish that I can monetize from

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I’m really sorry to hear that you live such a life. I’m ashamed. Although my parents are still working, they are old. I’ll find a way to do something.

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I was about to make a similar thread about who here is disabled and can’t work. I’ve been struggling with fatigue for the last couple of years so I can’t work and I live at home.

I am about to make a very tough decision in January of whether or not to go through with jaw surgery for sleep apnea to get my life back in light of recent and serious complications from PFS.

I don’t think I will go forward with it. Deciding between a life of disability or a potentially life changing surgery that could have catastrophic consequences. It’s pretty devastating to say the least. Might make a thread for it anyway, I don’t know.

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I really began to struggle at work from 2008 but unbelievably held on another decade. I had a very responsible job and was a high performing individual (like many on here) Things continued to decline and I struggled more and more. I couldn’t remember key parts of meetings, discussions, peoples names, I lost my ability to draft and spell, I suffered from emotional outbursts poor judgement etc. It was destroying me. My employer was extremely supportive and tried to persuade me stay but I couldn’t take anymore and left. I thought I had some form of rare cancer or brain disease and only made the connection to pfs 18 months prior to departing which is when I finally stopped taking fin. Since then the symptoms have only got worse but I took 1 year out and then started doing a little amount of volunteer work. It’s on my own terms and rewarding at times. It’s important to do what u can no matter what. Taking some time out is also worthwhile if u can afford to. Try to live every day like its your last and don’t worry about what lies ahead. Be grateful for what u have. There is always someone else who is worse off Being part of society is extremely important withdrawing feeds the catastrophic mindset that one of the many symptoms the neurosteroid imbalance causes and I expect would hold back any improvements. Accepting the new you brings a form of relief. I personally found the constant battle to hold on to my old life, social circle too much. Via the volunteer work I’ve come across some very inspirational people which at times has humbled me and made realise its worth hanging around no matter what. Making a small difference to people’s lives is priceless and free.

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Really, if I persist for ten years, I can make sure I have enough money to spend the rest of my life. The people here are really incredible. I decided to go back and try again until they fired me. PFS in the fourth month.I’m poor. My parents are very old. I have no choice,So desperate, all this,

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Cam show

I’m in university right now, I also have moderate cognitive impairment and have really hard classes like calculus and statistics. It sucks because I have to study 200% harder compared to other students just to pass. Life is already difficult, but PFS makes it way more difficult.

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Three years of PFS? Still brain fog? Sounds terrible. you have to learn calculus.god

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I have moderate cognitive impairment I can still memorize and learn things, just not as good as before. Calculus is hell, maybe if you are good at it you can teach me haha.

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I’m on disability since 2013. There is no way I could ever work a job again. I do help at my friends record store because I’m very knowledgeable in music and movies but that’s the max amount i can handle.

Before it really hit I worked as a sterile supply technician. Tbh it was a dead end job and although I’m very ill, artistically I have accomplished more in my late 20s and now 30s than I ever did before.

When I was able to I’d walk a lot down town and go tonthe park and be with friends and watch movies. Jm much more sick and limited now but I’m.very used to it. I couldn’t imagine the stress of working on top of this I am greatful I got permanent disability.

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i feel the same way about my parents. i wanted to retire them a long while back. hopefully soon :slight_smile:

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I don’t know anything about that kind of surgery, what sorts of consequences could there be?