Going to college with PFS


#1

I finished my university applications before I got PFS, and received my acceptances recently. Has anyone been through college with PFS? Was there anything that helped?

I have ADD but am not medicating because of PFS, and although my intellectual capacity has taken a major hit, there are days where I feel like I could manage coursework with a lot of dedication and going back on my medication.

Any reports of people who’ve been in my position are welcome.


#2

Might want to ask on reddit.com/r/tressless cause I think I’ve seen some posts of college aged kids getting PFS. Everybody here is a little bit older.

I think as long as you don’t have sleep issues you should get by fairly okay. The brain fog/memory loss/mental issues will make it harder depending on the severity but college is mostly a joke so it shouldn’t be that hard to get decent grades/pass.


#3

Going to class and trying to pass exams while crashing on fin was possibly the worst experience of my life. But living with PFS is different from experiencing the crash stage while worrying about graduating. Remember that you’re not the only one there suffering brain fog or cognitive decline, most students are victims to some drugs.


#4

Hey. I entered to the college pfs. I was helped by writing a lot of papers. I wrote papers and checked them here - Australia Papers Owl. The service helps in writing and checking essays. I wish you luck in your admission to colleges and universities. Thank you.


#5

I am enrolled in post graduate program, sadly I am not doing well.
I was one of the top student in my undergraduate program and graduated at 9th position out of 210 students in my batch.
Now I have failed a subject this semester and doing very bad.

How are you doing btw.


#6

I entered college with PSSD. I won’t lie, the first year was hard, but I worked hard and did better each year. By the end, I graduated with honors and was one of the better students in my graduating class. YOU CAN DO IT. It’s not easy, but I’m so so so happy I powered through. PFS and PSSD are awful, but I would still have PSSD today whether i finished my degree or not. Now, I am confident in my abilities and didn’t let PSSD impact my career outcomes!


#7

@borax you’re a smart MOFO, so I have no doubt you will slay college. Pfs is just leveling the playing field for everyone else :slight_smile:


#8

Thanks Ghost, I appreciate your input. I start in less than two weeks, so hopefully things go well. Do you have any advice for how to make it more manageable/any tools that helped you?


#9

Hahah thanks @Mcbbould, that gave me a good laugh :stuck_out_tongue:


#10

I haven’t started yet but I’ll update this thread as I progress. Sorry to hear that Sunny.


#11

Study a lot, and don’t worry if it takes you longer than other people. It might at first especially if your cognitive issues flair up.

Be fair with yourself. Sometimes the best you can do is not the best you COULD do if everything were ideal. Then again, no one at college will have everything ideal for all 4 years.

Sleep enough.

Be deliberate in organizing your time. When that time is up, feel free to take a bit of a break.


#12

I got my disease/syndrome during Nursing school at the very beginning of my second semester… It only made things troublesome when I was in a crash as I was completely incapable of studying or doing anything while in that state. Otherwise it was doable, it just required extra focus and hard work. I graduated with a 3.7 out of a 4.0.

There’s no doubt in my mind if I did not get this, I would’ve graduated with a higher GPA.


#13

@Ghost @gents93 thanks guys, I’m considering using a stimulant in addition to managing my time since I’ve deteriorated further after a recent incident, hopefully that goes well.


#14

I don’t know if it might be possible to discuss with your college that you have some health issues that may impact and they hopefully will make accommodations for this. I believe that in the U.K. if you declare a disability then there is a legal requirement to make adjustments to support you within reason. Even if you were to describe pfs in terms more universally understood, like chronic fatigue or something similar.


#16

i find it very hard because of the headaches. i think pfs destroyed my career